AI, Algorithm, Automata, Biological Computation, Code, Cybernetics, Deep Learning, Emergence, Man/Machine, Neural Networks, Robots, Science, Social intelligence, Society

Can a robot be too nice?

“Designing artificial entities perfectly groomed to meet our emotional needs has an obvious appeal, like creating the exact right person for a job from thin air. But it’s also not hard to imagine the problems that might arise in a world where we’re constantly dealing with robots calibrated to treat us, on an interpersonal level, exactly the way we want. We might start to prefer the company of robots to that of other, less perfectly optimized humans. We might react against them, hungry for some of the normal friction of human relations. As Lanier worried, we might start to see the lines blur, and become convinced that machines—which in some ways are vastly inferior to us, and in other ways vastly superior—are actually our equals.”

20140820-212301.jpg

Standard
AI, Algorithm, Biometrics, Brain, Capitalism, Cybernetics, Economy, Education, Emergence, Ethics, Man/Machine, Robots, Science, Social intelligence, Society

Will You Lose Your Job To a Robot?

“The biggest exception will be jobs that depend upon empathy as a core capacity — schoolteacher, personal service worker, nurse. These jobs are often those traditionally performed by women. One of the bigger social questions of the mid-late 2020s will be the role of men in this world.” — Jamais Cascio, technology writer and futurist

20140808-112942.jpg

Standard
AI, Algorithm, Automata, Biological Computation, Brain, Code, Cybernetics, Deep Learning, Logic, Man/Machine, Mathematics, Neural Networks, Science, Social intelligence

Neural Networks and Deep Learning

“Will we understand how such intelligent networks work? Perhaps the networks will be opaque to us, with weights and biases we don’t understand, because they’ve been learned automatically. In the early days of AI research people hoped that the effort to build an AI would also help us understand the principles behind intelligence and, maybe, the functioning of the human brain. But perhaps the outcome will be that we end up understanding neither the brain nor how artificial intelligence works!”

20140709-235628.jpg

20140709-235645.jpg

Standard
Algorithm, Architecture, Art, Automata, Biological Computation, Chaos, Code, Cybernetics, Drawing machine, History, Interface, Kinetic, Light, Logic, Maker, Man/Machine, Mathematics, Neural Networks, PDF, Social intelligence, Society, Tactical Media

Cybernetic Serendipity the Computer and the Arts – (1968)

Exhibition catalogue. Edited by Jasia Reichardt (Studio International Special Issue, London. 1968)

20140701-225815.jpg

Standard
AI, Algorithm, Biological Computation, Brain, Code, Cybernetics, History, Interface, Logic, Man/Machine, Mathematics, Neural Networks, PDF, Science, Social intelligence, Society

Computing Machinery and Intelligence : Turing, A.M. (1950).

The fact that Babbage’s Analytical Engine was to be entirely mechanical will help us to rid ourselves of a superstition. Importance is often attached to the fact that modern digital computers are electrical, and that the nervous system also is electrical. Since Babbage’s machine was not electrical, and since all digital computers are in a sense equivalent, we see that this use of electricity cannot be of theoretical importance. Of course electricity usually comes in where fast signalling is concerned, so that it is not surprising that we find it in both these connections. In the nervous system chemical phenomena are at least as important as electrical. In certain computers the storage system is mainly acoustic. The feature of using electricity is thus seen to be only a very superficial similarity. If we wish to find such similarities we should took rather for mathematical analogies of function.

20140630-085450.jpg

Standard
Algorithm, Art, Brain, Man/Machine, Music, phenomenology, Sound

Andrew Lucia : Rhythm to Pitch

“To the human, the transformation of rhythm to pitch occurs at a particular perceptual threshold of roughly 16 to 20 Hz. For example, a sonic rhythm sped up above roughly 20 pulses per second will blur perceptually from a rhythm to a pitch. For our studies, we specifically examine these gaps between each new bit of information received by an observer. These gaps can exist spatially as the interval between each bit, or temporally as the duration between each bit. Our investigations presented here visually demonstrate formal aspects of underlying frequency space and structure inspired by the examination of two particular works of the composer Karlheinz Stockhausen; Kontakte and Elektronische Musik Studie II.”

20140626-231657.jpg

Standard
Architecture, Art, Automata, Chaos, Drawing machine, Kinetic, Maker, Man/Machine, Sound

Jean Tinguely Art Machines, 1959.

“His best-known work, a self-destroying sculpture titled Homage to New York (1960), only partially self-destructed at the Museum of Modern Art, New York City, although his later work, Study for an End of the World No. 2 (1962), detonated successfully in front of an audience gathered in the desert outside Las Vegas.”

20140624-223955.jpg

Standard